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Injured From a Slip and Fall at Dollar Tree*

If you slipped and fell at a Dollar Tree store or any other established business, you might hear the word “reasonable” several times.

It all boils down to whether Dollar Tree or any discount variety store made a reasonable effort to prevent the slip and fall.

To prove negligence, you should speak with the store manager, collect and organize evidence, and consider reaching out to a personal injury lawyer who specializes in slip and fall cases.

Injuries You Can Suffer Because of a Slip and Fall at a Discount Variety Store

When you think about the types of injuries caused by a slip and fall, the first thing that comes to your mind probably is a broken or a sprained wrist.

When we lose our balance and tumble towards the ground, we instinctively place our hands out to cushion the impact of the fall.

This often leads to one or both wrists receiving a tremendous blow that caused a sprain or a fracture.

There is also the possibility of suffering a knee injury.

Slipping and falling causes the body to contort into highly irregular positions.

One or both knees can contort to the point that a ligament tears, which triggers excruciating pain.

Recovering from ligament damage to the knee can take several months, which means you might miss considerable time at work.

With medical bills piling up at warp speed, you should reach out to a personal injury attorney to recover lost wages and medical expenses.

Handling a Slip and Fall Incident at a Discount Variety Store

You cannot expect to win a personal injury claim against Dollar Tree or any discount variety store unless you know how to react after a slip and fall incident.

The first thing on your to-do list is to make sure you have not suffered any life-threatening injuries.

Safety first should be your mantra, even if that means calling 911 for an emergency response team.

If you are capable of moving around, speak with the store manager to file an incident report.

The store manager should interview employees that witnessed the slip and fall, as well as watch the store security footage to determine whether the store is legally liable for negligence.

Injured From a Slip and Fall at Dollar Tree*

Evidence You Should Collect

You should not rely on the store manager to help you collect evidence.

You need to collect evidence that demonstrates negligence on the part of Dollar Tree or any variety discount store.

Take photographs of the areas where you fell, as well as interview witnesses by running the video feature on your cell phone.

Since you might have to deal with mounting medical bills, make copies of every invoice and the medical documents that confirm the diagnosis of one or more injuries.

Slip and fall incidents are not just about wet floors.

Obstacles in the aisles can lead to slips and falls. Poor lighting or simply bad visibility are two more reasons why some customers slip and fall at Dollar Tree stores or other established businesses.

Contact a Personal Injury Attorney

You should contact a personal injury lawyer to balance the scales of justice.

Your attorney will first try to negotiate a favorable settlement, and if that does not work, he or she will not hesitate to file a claim against Dollar Tree or any discount variety store that seeks just compensation for your slip and fall injuries.

*The content of this article serves only to provide information and should not be construed as legal advice. If you file a claim against Dollar Tree or another party, you may not be entitled to any compensation.

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